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Sembradores Training Venezuela

Training indigenous leaders, the foundation for a church and community transformation

Sembradores is a Spanish word for “seed sowers”. 

When we first started our pastor training, we shared the parable of the seed and the importance of the “little things” in God’s kingdom. Wayuu pastors realized how important is the seed but, at the same time, how easily it can be underestimated. We read Matthew 13:37-38

“He answered, “The one who sowed the good seed is the Son of Man. The field is the world, and the good seed stands for the people of the kingdom. The weeds are the people of the evil one”

They understood how important they are in taking the gospel to their own people, realizing that they are sowers and also the seed.

One of them spoke up and said: What if we call this training “Sembradores” (Seed Sowers)?

At Bread of Hope, we believe that biblically-equipped local leaders are fundamental in accomplishing our goal of reaching the Wayuu people with the gospel. They can overcome the cultural barriers better than we can, they know and understand their culture and communities, they speak the language and have influence among their people.

Last Easter, we started the first Sembradores training in Venezuela. We spent a whole week with six Wayuu leaders studying the progressive revelation of the gospel from the beginning (Genesis) to the fulfillment of the promises in Jesus (the Gospels).

“It was amazing to see their eye lighting up as they discovered the connections between the Old Testament stories and Jesus. Balmiro, one of the participants who was also our Spanish-Wayuunaiki interpreter, broke down in tears during one of the teaching sessions as we learned how God’s salvation was promised and accomplished in Christ.” 

Alfredo Hernandez. Bread of Hope Ministry Coordinator VEN.

The Sembradores training is a two-year training. Hosting the training in Venezuela and Colombia can ensure the beginning of a new group and a graduation every year, as we alternate starting a training in Venezuela and one in Colombia the following year.

Developing this process in Venezuela is vital to our strategy to geographically expand and multiply our reach to cover the entire Guajira territory.